Home FAQ Contact
Email : info@pfrcivf.com || Phone : 9940157127 , 9841248649


Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player.

Get Adobe Flash player

Enquiry...



Can't read the image? click here to refresh
  * Mandatory Fields
Before Cancer Treatment Begins
You are wishing to store sperm at Monash IVF because you are receiving treatment for a serious medical condition that may permanently damage your testes and their ability to produce sperm. It is possible to freeze and store sperm for many years. In some cases semen parameters, such as count and motility, may be impaired at the time of freezing due to the effects of general ill health (e.g. fevers) associated with your disease.
After Cancer Treatment Begins
You have informed our staff that you have already commenced treatment with either radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Some laboratories would decline to store such sperm because of concerns that the treatment you have already received may have damaged your sperm and could have adverse effects for any children born using that sperm. The possibility of such sperm damage maybe affected by the type, dose and duration of treatment that you have already received. Furthermore, there may not be reliable information available about the risks to your sperm that may have resulted
from your particular type of treatment. Nonetheless it may be possible in the future to use your sperm for fertility treatments, such as insemination of your partner or an IVF procedure. It is possible that the sperm in your ejaculate may soon disappear permanently as a result of your treatments. Therefore immediate sperm storage may represent a ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity to give you the possibility of future parenthood. Unfortunately there is no guarantee that pregnancy will result from any treatment. There are many known and many unknown reasons why it can be difficult to achieve a pregnancy.
The purpose of this information is to simply inform you that there is some question about the safety of using this stored sperm, and that you and your partner should seek the most expert advice prior to commencing any future
treatments.
In agreeing to store your sperm, PFRC provides no guarantee as to the capability of the stored sperm to result in a pregnancy or to affect a pregnancy, nor can it be held liable for any abnormality of a child resulting from the use of the stored sperm.
Sperm can be obtained directly from the testes using testicular biopsy, or by needle aspiration from the tubes, at the back of the testes, that carry the sperm. The most common reason for  undertaking these procedures is the presence of obstruction to the sperm transport system. As a result of such blockages, there are no sperm in the ejaculate, however, there are still large numbers of sperm being produced in the testes. This situation can be either present from birth or can follow scarring or blockage in the sperm tubes, such as after infection or vasectomy. As these sperm are not yet able to swim well or reliably fertilise the egg, they must be used for microinjection IVF (ICSI) in order to give the best chance of pregnancy.  There are two approaches to obtaining sperm in men with obstruction. Both methods are usually performed under  local anaesthetic that is injected into the lower groin area just above the testes. General anaesthetic is rarely required for this procedure. A small area of the skin and the whole testes becomes numb:
1. Aspiration from the epididymis (called PESA). The epididymis is the fine tube into which sperm first flow after leaving the testes. In about half vasectomised men, excellent sperm can be obtained by PESA but in the remainder, a testicular biopsy is required. It must be noted that the epididymis may be damaged by this procedure and thereby decrease the chance of successful surgical vasectomy reversal in the future, should the man decide not to continue with IVF.
2. Needle biopsy of the testes is performed when the epididymis is not suitable for PESA or if this has been unsuccessful. Sperm can be readily obtained following the removal of a small piece (less than half a small grain of rice) of the sperm producing tubules using a fine needle. The embryologist looks for sperm in the biopsy sample and removes them for microinjection. Both procedures take about 15 minutes. Occasionally, sperm can be left over from the procedure and frozen for use in subsequent microinjection cycles. However, if the sperm quality is no good, a repeat biopsy will have to be performed in the next cycle.
The needle biopsy procedure is well tolerated but may rarely result in bleeding into the testes and even permanent damage. However, results of the microinjection procedure using testicular sperm are similar to other couples undergoing IVF and are determined mainly by the age and reproductive  capacity of the female. In men with no sperm in the ejaculate due to a failure of sperm production, an open testicular biopsy may be considered.
Patients often ask why, if there is no blockage, sperm can be found in the testes but not in the semen. Basically, it is thought that the very small numbers of sperm that are released into the sperm tubules are ‘lost in transit’ and never appear in the ejaculate. Nonetheless small “islands” of sperm production persist despite the extensive damage elsewhere in the testes. In about 45% of cases, sper m can be found in the wall of the sperm tubules. A needle biopsy to more precisely determine the type of sperm production failure may help predict whether sperm will be found at open biopsy at a later date at the time of egg collection and ICSI. In open testicular biopsy procedure, several pieces of testes are removed from different places on one or both testes, with the total amount of tissue being equal to about ½ml. This procedure is performed under general anaesthesia. Sperm are located after carefully dissecting the biopsy under the microscope. In most cases the biopsy is done on the same day as the partner is having eggs collected so that ICSI is done with freshly isolated sperm. As no sperm may be found, couples would need to consider, in advance of the cycle, whether to discard or donate the eggs, or to use donor sperm as a “back-up”.
In some cases, the biopsy may be performed prior to the ICSI attempt and sperm frozen but this is not always possible and sometimes sperm do not survive the freezing and thawing process and a fresh biopsy is required. In order to allow the testis to recover, there is a 6 month resting period before repeat biopsy of the same testis. Many of the men suitable for this procedure have small testes  and some have borderline-low testosterone secretion. This is a significant issue because there is a small chance that significant permanent damage may be caused by the open biopsy procedure and lead to the man requiring life-long testosteronereplacement therapy to maintain good health.

FOR CANCER PATIENTS



Before Cancer Treatment Begins


You are wishing to store sperm at Monash IVF because you are receiving treatment for a serious medical condition that may permanently damage your testes and their ability to produce sperm. It is possible to freeze and store sperm for many years. In some cases semen parameters, such as count and motility, may be impaired at the time of freezing due to the effects of general ill health (e.g. fevers) associated with your disease.

After Cancer Treatment Begins


You have informed our staff that you have already commenced treatment with either radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Some laboratories would decline to store such sperm because of concerns that the treatment you have already received may have damaged your sperm and could have adverse effects for any children born using that sperm. The possibility of such sperm damage maybe affected by the type, dose and duration of treatment that you have already received. Furthermore, there may not be reliable information available about the risks to your sperm that may have resultedfrom your particular type of treatment. Nonetheless it may be possible in the future to use your sperm for fertility treatments, such as insemination of your partner or an IVF procedure. It is possible that the sperm in your ejaculate may soon disappear permanently as a result of your treatments. Therefore immediate sperm storage may represent a ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity to give you the possibility of future parenthood. Unfortunately there is no guarantee that pregnancy will result from any treatment. There are many known and many unknown reasons why it can be difficult to achieve a pregnancy.

The purpose of this information is to simply inform you that there is some question about the safety of using this stored sperm, and that you and your partner should seek the most expert advice prior to commencing any future
treatments.


 In agreeing to store your sperm, PFRC provides no guarantee as to the capability of the stored sperm to result in a pregnancy or to affect a pregnancy, nor can it be held liable for any abnormality of a child resulting from the use of the stored sperm.

Sperm can be obtained directly from the testes using testicular biopsy, or by needle aspiration from the tubes, at the back of the testes, that carry the sperm. The most common reason for  undertaking these procedures is the presence of obstruction to the sperm transport system. As a result of such blockages, there are no sperm in the ejaculate, however, there are still large numbers of sperm being produced in the testes. This situation can be either present from birth or can follow scarring or blockage in the sperm tubes, such as after infection or vasectomy. As these sperm are not yet able to swim well or reliably fertilise the egg, they must be used for microinjection IVF (ICSI) in order to give the best chance of pregnancy.  There are two approaches to obtaining sperm in men with obstruction. Both methods are usually performed under  local anaesthetic that is injected into the lower groin area just above the testes. General anaesthetic is rarely required for this procedure. A small area of the skin and the whole testes becomes numb:

1. Aspiration from the epididymis (called PESA). The epididymis is the fine tube into which sperm first flow after leaving the testes. In about half vasectomised men, excellent sperm can be obtained by PESA but in the remainder, a testicular biopsy is required. It must be noted that the epididymis may be damaged by this procedure and thereby decrease the chance of successful surgical vasectomy reversal in the future, should the man decide not to continue with IVF.

2. Needle biopsy of the testes is performed when the epididymis is not suitable for PESA or if this has been FOR CANCER PATIENTS

Before Cancer Treatment Begins

You are wishing to store sperm at Monash IVF because you are receiving treatment for a serious medical condition that may permanently damage your testes and their ability to produce sperm. It is possible to freeze and store sperm for many years. In some cases semen parameters, such as count and motility, may be impaired at the time of freezing due to the effects of general ill health (e.g. fevers) associated with your disease.

After Cancer Treatment Begins

You have informed our staff that you have already commenced treatment with either radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy. Some laboratories would decline to store such sperm because of concerns that the treatment you have already received may have damaged your sperm and could have adverse effects for any children born using that sperm. The possibility of such sperm damage maybe affected by the type, dose and duration of treatment that you have already received. Furthermore, there may not be reliable information available about the risks to your sperm that may have resulted from your particular type of treatment. Nonetheless it may be possible in the future to use your sperm for fertility treatments, such as insemination of your partner or an IVF procedure. It is possible that the sperm in your ejaculate may soon disappear permanently as a result of your treatments. Therefore immediate sperm storage may represent a ‘once in a lifetime’ opportunity to give you the possibility of future parenthood. Unfortunately there is no guarantee that pregnancy will result from any treatment. There are many known and many unknown reasons why it can be difficult to achieve a pregnancy.

The purpose of this information is to simply inform you that there is some question about the safety of using this stored sperm, and that you and your partner should seek the most expert advice prior to commencing any future
treatments.



 In agreeing to store your sperm, PFRC provides no guarantee as to the capability of the stored sperm to result in a pregnancy or to affect a pregnancy, nor can it be held liable for any abnormality of a child resulting from the use of the stored sperm.

Sperm can be obtained directly from the testes using testicular biopsy, or by needle aspiration from the tubes, at the back of the testes, that carry the sperm. The most common reason for  undertaking these procedures is the presence of obstruction to the sperm transport system. As a result of such blockages, there are no sperm in the ejaculate, however, there are still large numbers of sperm being produced in the testes. This situation can be either present from birth or can follow scarring or blockage in the sperm tubes, such as after infection or vasectomy. As these sperm are not yet able to swim well or reliably fertilise the egg, they must be used for microinjection IVF (ICSI) in order to give the best chance of pregnancy.  There are two approaches to obtaining sperm in men with obstruction. Both methods are usually performed under  local anaesthetic that is injected into the lower groin area just above the testes. General anaesthetic is rarely required for this procedure. A small area of the skin and the whole testes becomes numb:


1. Aspiration from the epididymis (called PESA). The epididymis is the fine tube into which sperm first flow after leaving the testes. In about half vasectomised men, excellent sperm can be obtained by PESA but in the remainder, a testicular biopsy is required. It must be noted that the epididymis may be damaged by this procedure and thereby decrease the chance of successful surgical vasectomy reversal in the future, should the man decide not to continue with IVF.


2. Needle biopsy of the testes is performed when the epididymis is not suitable for PESA or if this has been unsuccessful. Sperm can be readily obtained following the removal of a small piece (less than half a small grain of rice) of the sperm producing tubules using a fine needle. The embryologist looks for sperm in the biopsy sample and removes them for microinjection. Both procedures take about 15 minutes. Occasionally, sperm can be left over from the procedure and frozen for use in subsequent microinjection cycles. However, if the sperm quality is no good, a repeat biopsy will have to be performed in the next cycle.


The needle biopsy procedure is well tolerated but may rarely result in bleeding into the testes and even permanent damage. However, results of the microinjection procedure using testicular sperm are similar to other couples undergoing IVF and are determined mainly by the age and reproductive  capacity of the female. In men with no sperm in the ejaculate due to a failure of sperm production, an open testicular biopsy may be considered.


Patients often ask why, if there is no blockage, sperm can be found in the testes but not in the semen. Basically, it is thought that the very small numbers of sperm that are released into the sperm tubules are ‘lost in transit’ and never appear in the ejaculate. Nonetheless small “islands” of sperm production persist despite the extensive damage elsewhere in the testes. In about 45% of cases, sper m can be found in the wall of the sperm tubules. A needle biopsy to more precisely determine the type of sperm production failure may help predict whether sperm will be found at open biopsy at a later date at the time of egg collection and ICSI. In open testicular biopsy procedure, several pieces of testes are removed from different places on one or both testes, with the total amount of tissue being equal to about ½ml. This procedure is performed under general anaesthesia. Sperm are located after carefully dissecting the biopsy under the microscope. In most cases the biopsy is done on the same day as the partner is having eggs collected so that ICSI is done with freshly isolated sperm. As no sperm may be found, couples would need to consider, in advance of the cycle, whether to discard or donate the eggs, or to use donor sperm as a “back-up”.


In some cases, the biopsy may be performed prior to the ICSI attempt and sperm frozen but this is not always possible and sometimes sperm do not survive the freezing and thawing process and a fresh biopsy is required. In order to allow the testis to recover, there is a 6 month resting period before repeat biopsy of the same testis. Many of the men suitable for this procedure have small testes  and some have borderline-low testosterone secretion. This is a significant issue because there is a small chance that significant permanent damage may be caused by the open biopsy procedure and lead to the man requiring life-long testosteronereplacement therapy to maintain good health.

 
Copyright © 2014 Prashanth Multispeciality Hospitals . All Rights Reserved                                 Site developed by Sri Hema Infotech.